MBSing: Episode Archive

From the podcast: MBSing

Wednesday, October 25th, 2017

Symphony Sanders has been interested in the personal stories behind her favorite performers since she was a kid. She likes being informed on what goes on in artists lives at least partially because she feels it brings important interpersonal and sociopolitical realities into public conversations, but also because she has a good time with it and likes being expressive about her own life on social media as well.

From the podcast: MBSing

Wednesday, October 18th, 2017

Once Matt had wrestled with the big Qs of "Where do we go after this?" and "Why do we do what we do?" in his youth, he found himself more focused on the even bigger picture as as adult: "Where did this all come from?" Now, oscillating between all three and folding these big questions into being a psychiatric nurse, writer, and improviser, he finds the idea that all of existence came from cosmic "shrapnel" inordinately comforting.

From the podcast: MBSing

Wednesday, October 11th, 2017

Ready for a dense chat about embarrassment, purpose, and fear of death? Good, because it’s coming for you! Shay went from being an artist and coproducer of Mortified Chicago to adding a more recent passion for being a death doula and funeral celebrant. Throughout those projects, she's asked others how they want to be perceived and remembered by audiences and loved ones, what story they want to be telling.

From the podcast: MBSing

Wednesday, October 4th, 2017

Dive in to this inception of a podcast: MBS was on Blank Cassette to talk to Eric Garneau about U Talkin' U2 To Me. On a week by week basis, Eric uses Blank Cassette to interview a guest about a mixtape or playlist they've made in the past and what went into its construction.

From the podcast: MBSing

Wednesday, September 27th, 2017

Melzer has been mesmerized by Wes Anderson's style since he saw The Royal Tenanbaums in high school, but it was his ability to relate to Rushmore's Max Fischer that cemented Anderson in his pile of people to intake, praise, and emulate. Wander through Wes's filmography with an aspiring filmmaker and learn about how important storyboarding is for Anderson's films, the ways he has brought back classic filmmaking techniques, and the distinctive dialog and powerful aesthetic choices that craft his unique and endearing style.

From the podcast: MBSing

Wednesday, September 20th, 2017

Ever since Ben learned to ace Jungle King and Fireball in his family's basement as a kid, he's been a pinball fiend, seeking out machines on boardwalks and at bars so enthusiastically that he eventually founded Pinball Chicago, a league of competitive gamers and compendium of spots in the city that offer pinball.

From the podcast: MBSing

Wednesday, September 13th, 2017

Ever since he saw Jackie Chan's First Strike at the age of 7, Eli has been a huge fan of Chan. All of Eli's favorite fights and films are covered as well as some fun facts about the Chinese opera school friends Chan has made the most movies with and his penchants for singing the theme songs to his movies and making blooper reels of outtakes and stunt failures.

From the podcast: MBSing

Wednesday, September 6th, 2017

Maria Randazzo starts her week by perusing a couple of horoscope sources, so this conversation starts with signs (sun and rising) and continues through how these messages permeate her day-to-day life and thoughts on spirituality and the world beyond the physical Earth. She's also looking for someone to sponsor her interest in getting more frequest psychic readings, so inquire within.

From the podcast: MBSing

Wednesday, August 30th, 2017

Clint Worthington developed a love for film as an Illinois farm boy who was admittedly more of an inside, MST3K boy than anything else. Since those days of pirated satellite, he's spent years watching film with a critical eye producing reviews for his own podcasting network at Alcohollywood.com and for Consequence of Sound as well as becoming a member of the Chicago Independent Film Critics Circle. Clint talks movies as empathy machines, reviewing film through the lens of an audience and not just as one critic, and being a Michael Bay apologist.

From the podcast: MBSing

Wednesday, August 23rd, 2017

Jamison Webb started watching Marx Brothers movies as an ill-sleeping 7-year-old. Since then he's written sketches in their style (The Inappropriate ReMarx Brothers) and spotted their influence in other acts he loves (Stella) as well as becoming aware that they're like The Beatles of comedy.

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